NURSING

Dr. Ann Cain

Room 420

Parsons Hall

UMAB

Baltimore, Maryland 21201

(410) 706-7503

UMAB, School of Nursing (NURS)

Barbara R. Heller, Dean

Ann Cain, Interim Associate Dean, Graduate Studies and Research

Professors

Associate Professors

Assistant Professors

Degrees Offered: Ph.D.

Program Description:

master's degree program in nursing is designed for students who wish to develop competence in a specialized area of nursing practice. The curriculum includes core, specialty, research, and elective components. Multiple tracks are available within specialty areas of concentration (majors) to provide individualized courses of study. An R.N. to M.S. program option allows streamlined progression to the M.S. degree.

The doctoral nursing program is designed for nurses with master's preparation in a specialty area of nursing who wish to provide leadership in advancing nursing knowledge through research.The curriculum includes a core of courses that address the theoretical and empirical bases for nursing, the techniques of theory development and research, and electives that allow the student to develop an individualized program of study. A postbaccalaureate entry option is available.

Information about these programs can be obtained from the:Office of Admissions< Enrollment Management

School of Nursing

UMAB

655 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, MD 21201.

Proagram Specialties M.S. Degree

Acute/Long-Term Care: Medical-Surgical Nursing, Oncology Nursing, Trauma/Critical Care Nursing, Gerontological/Geriatric Nursing; Psychiatric and Psychiatric Nursing, Community Health

Community Health: Home Care Nursing Services, Community Addictions Nursing, Intercultural Nursing;

Primary Care Nursing: Adult Nurse Practitioner, Geriatric Nurse Practitioner;

Maternal-Child Nursing: Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing, Nursing of Children, Obstetrical/Gynecological Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner;

Nursing Education: Associate Degree Teaching, Baccalaureate Degree Teaching, Staff Development Teaching;

Administration: Nursing Administration, Nursing Administration/Business Administration, Nursing Informatics, Nursing/Health Policy.

The Ph.D. Degree:

Within this research oriented program, students specialize in direct nursing (clinical nursing research) or indirect nursing (research related to nursing care delivery, administration, education, health policy, informatics, or evaluation).

Program Admission and Degree Requirements:Program Admission requirements and procedures correspond to the requirements set forth by the Graduate School of the University of Maryland. The applicant to the master's degree program must be a registered, professional nurse who has earned a baccalaureate degree from an NLN accredited institution, which offers an upper division major in nursing equivalent to that offered at the University of Maryland. Potential to achieve at the graduate level is evaluated individually based on 1) undergraduate GPA, 2) three appropriate references, 3) interviews upon request, and 4) GRE (aptitude portion) scores. An elementary course in statistics is an admission prerequisite, and some specialties require prerequisite physiology and physical assessment skills.Program Also, 0-2 years work experience is required, depending on the specialty area. The student must be licensed as a registered nurse in Maryland before taking any course with a practicum component. The applicant to the doctoral program must have earned a master's degree in nursing or its equivalent. Potential for doctoral study is evaluated based on 1) GRE (aptitude portion), 2) cumulative GPA, 3) interviews upon request and 4) three appropriate references. A graduate course (at least three credits) in research and inferential statistics is an admission prerequisite. M.S. Degree Requirements: Credit and course requirements vary from 42 to 45 credits, depending on the specialty area chosen. Most specialties (except primary care) can be completed within three semesters plus a summer of full-time study. Part-time study is available. Specific core and research courses are required of all students. Students may select either a thesis or non-thesis option.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements:

Students must complete a minimum of 60 post-master's credits in nursing theory (14 cr.), research and statistics (17 cr.), electives (17 cr.) and dissertation research (12 cr.). Students must successfully complete preliminary, comprehensive, and final oral (dissertation defense) examinations and are required to write a dissertation reporting the results of an original, independent research project.

Facilities and Special Resources:

Students are able to take advantage of the wide variety of clinical resources available within the state of Maryland and in the Washington, D.C. area. Computer resources of the School of Nursing and UMAB are available to all students.

Financial Assistance:

A limited number of Federal Nurse Traineeships are usually available to qualified full- time and some part-time graduate students. Graduate research and teaching assistantships are awarded to a limited number of doctoral students each year. University fellowships may also be obtained.

COURSES:

NURS 602 Critical Approaches to Nursing Theories Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's ability in critical thinking and scientific inquiry in nursing. Opportunity is provided for the student to analyze the role of theory in nursing as a practice discipline. The history of theory development is presented and the applicability of selected nursing theories to the role of the nurse is examined.

NURS 606 Influential Forces in Nursing and Health Care Credits: 3

This core course provides an analysis of health care trends, organizations and settings, and provider and consumer roles in the financing, legislation, regulation, politics, ethics, and evaluation of nursing and health care. Emphasis is placed on nursing's role in effecting health care system change and on the effects of external forces on nursing practice. Leadership strategies and nursing roles for influencing practice decisions within the health care system are examined.

NURS 607 Alcoholism and Family Systems Credits: 3

The theory content and clinical practicum of this course are designed for the study of alcoholism and the concomitant family patterns of organization. The course emphasizes the use of regulatory processes for the restoration of optimal balance within the family, and between the family and its environment, the recruitment of family members into treatment, and the prevention of illness among vulnerable family members. Offered spring semester.

NURS 608 Special Problems in Nursing Credits: 1-3

Provides for alternative learning experiences: independent study; development of specific clinical competencies; classes focusing on a variety of special interest topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature. Registration upon consent of advisor. Students may register for one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree.

NURS 609 Critical Issues in Health Care Credits: 3

Allows an interdisciplinary group of students to examine the policy, legal, and ethical components of a number of critical issues in health care delivery. A variety of teaching techniques, including case studies, simulations, mock hearings, and panel discussions will be used to explore such topics as medical malpractice, rights of patients to refuse treatment, informed consent and substituted consent in medical decision making, regulation of experimental drugs, cost containment in the health care system and delivery of health care to the poor and indigent. The course will be taught by faculty from a variety of disciplines including law, philosophy, nursing, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, social work, and economics.

NURS 610 Studies in Normal and Atypical Growth Credits: 2

Includes a study of normal human embryology and provides facilities for an in-depth study of one or more aspects of atypical tissue or cellular growth. Course material is adapted to suit the interests of individual students.

NURS 611 Introduction to Primary Care Nursing Credits: 3

Utilizes seminar, laboratory and clinical experiences that emphasize the development of the expanded nursing role. Students have the opportunity to refine assessment skills as they collect and analyze data in the clinical area using a variety of interviewing, examining and recording skills. Role boundaries, role facilitation and barriers to role implementation are analyzed in seminar sessions. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 600.

NURS 612 Trends and Issues in Women's Health Care Credits: 2

The purpose of this course is to synthesize knowledge and skills gained in previous courses and concurrent experience in providing primary health care to women. Concepts specific to women individually and collectively are analyzed in relation to clients seen in clinical settings. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: NURS 611, NPHY 600, NPHY 610, and NURS 613. Concurrent or prerequisite: NPHY 608.

NURS 613 Clinical Diagnosis and Management I Credits: 4

Prepares the student to function at a beginning level as a nurse practitioner in an ambulatory setting. This is the first of two sequential courses that apply the nursing process through communication and assessment skills, interpreting findings, applying laboratory diagnostic methods, developing plans of care, and implementing nursing strategies to promote the personal, cognitive, and physical health of adults with common health problems. Offered spring semester. Prerequisites: NURS 611; NPHY 600 (can be taken concurrently).

NURS 614 Clinical Diagnosis and Management II Credits: 5

Prepares the student to function as a nurse practitioner in an ambulatory setting with clients who have complex health problems. This is the second of two sequential courses that apply the nursing process through communication and assessment skills, interpreting findings, applying laboratory diagnostic methods, developing plans of care, and implementing nursing strategies to promote personal, cognitive and physical health of clients. Focus is on in-depth knowledge and specialty development. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: NURS 613.

NURS 615 Advanced Primary Health Care of Adults Credits: 5

Provides for application of theory to clinical experiences. Seminar sessions are designed to assist the student in analyzing multiple variables in health and disease and, through a problem-solving approach, in determining an optimal plan in relation to both short- and long-term goals. The emphasis is on increased independence and decision making in an interprofessional environment. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite: NURS 614.

NURS 616 Primary Care of Women Credits: 4

Builds upon prerequisite primary care courses to provide the knowledge and skills necessary for a nurse practitioner to manage health maintenance and non-life threatening disruptions specific to women. Emphasis is placed on collaboration with other health care providers. The content includes normal antepartum and postpartum care, family planning, and common gynecological disruptions throughout the life span. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite or concurrent: NURS 612.

NURS 618 Special Problems in Primary Care Credits: 1-3

An independent study experience that allows students in the primary care department to examine selected concepts, to develop special competencies, or obtain in-depth clinical experience. Students outside the department may elect this experience to study selected concepts relating to primary care nursing. Students may register for varying units of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 621 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Credits: 3

This first-level medical-surgical nursing course will be based on a psychophysiological approach to nursing practice. Aspects of health promotion such as proper nutrition, exercise, and relaxation will be discussed as well as their physiological indicators. Research concerning the health risk of smoking, stress, hypertension, and obesity will be evaluated. Psychosocial aspects of health as well as mechanisms for patient education and adherence will be integrated throughout the course.

NURS 622 Medical-Surgical Nursing II Credits: 3

In this second-level course in adult medical-surgical nursing physiological aspects of acute care, such as oxygenation circulation, and psychoneuroimmunological functioning will be discussed from a psychophysiological prospective. Multidimensional nursing interventions to manage patients with nursing diagnoses such as pain, dyspnea, and fatigue, as well as those to promote patient mobility, sexuality, and coping will be evaluated and then tested in the clinical area. The course includes lecture/seminar, clinical practice and supervision of clinical experiences in the management of selected patients. Students are encouraged to pursue their own area of clinical emphasis. Prerequisites: NPHY 600 and NURS 621

NURS 623 Trauma/Critical Care Nursing I Credits: 3

This first clinical course is designed to provide the student an opportunity to explore selected concepts such as oxygenation/ventilation, transport/perfusion, and cognition, which may be altered in the trauma/critical care patient. A major focus is on the assessment process. Assessment strategies related to the concepts are presented and clinical experience in a trauma/critical care setting is provided for application and analysis of these assessment strategies. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 600.

NURS 624 Trauma/Critical Care Nursing II Credits: 3

This is a second course in a three-semester sequence of advanced clinical knowledge for trauma/critical care nursing. The focus is on the assessment of concepts and examination of research-based interventions central to trauma/critical care nursing practice. A clinical practicum is included that offers the opportunity to test course theory, expand collaborative and advanced nursing skills, and progress toward achievement of individual professional goals. Prerequisites: NURS 623 and 701.

NURS 625 Introduction to Gerontological Nursing Credits: 2

This first-level course is designed to provide the student the opportunity to explore systematically concepts pertinent to older adults. Emphasis is placed on maximizing functional health status, patient outcomes, and independence of the older adult consistent with the limitations imposed by the aging process and/or chronic illness. Strategies aimed at promoting, maintaining, and restoring health and independent functioning are examined. Implications for clinical practice are considered. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 600.

NURS 626 Processes of Aging: Implications for Nursing Care Credits: 4

Provides an in-depth analysis of specific concepts related to alterations in the health of the older adult, especially the frail older adult. Emphasis is placed on assessment methodologies and research-based interventions designed to assist the individual to cope with acute and chronic alterations in health and, where possible, prevent alterations in health. A clinical practicum is included to provide the student with the opportunity to test theory, expand advanced nursing skills and pursue individual professional goals. Prerequisites: NURS 625 and 701. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 614.

NURS 628 Special Problems in Medical-Surgical Nursing Credits: 1-3

Provides alternative learning experiences: independent study; development of specific clinical competencies; classes focusing on a variety of special topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature within the broad category of medical-surgical nursing. Students may register for varying amounts of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 629 Oncology Nursing I Credits: 3

Provides an introduction to primary and secondary cancer prevention, based on current knowledge of carcinogenesis and risk factors. Diagnosis and staging of cancers, with the implications for therapy and prognosis, are emphasized. Roles of the nurse in advanced practice are analyzed, with a focus on risk assessment, health education, and client care.

NURS 630 Oncology Nursing II Credits: 3

Provides the opportunity to apply knowledge of cancer treatment modalities and the pathophysiology of site-specific cancers to symptom management of persons with cancer in a variety of care settings, i.e., acute care, ambulatory care, hospice. Emphasis on the use of nursing diagnosis and nursing research findings in planning, implementation, and evaluation of advanced oncology nursing practice. Prerequisites: NURS 629 and NPHY 600.

NURS 632 Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing II Credits: 4

The second course in the perinatal/neonatal health nursing sequence has a dual focus on developing in-depth knowledge of selected health problems of pregnant and postpartum women and infants and their nursing management, and on increasing collaborative and research skills in professional nursing. Application of theoretical and clinical knowledge occurs within an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship. Prerequisites: NURS 602 and NURS 639. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 608.

NURS 633 Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing III Credits: 2

The focus of this course is on the theoretical basis of perinatal and neonatal nursing for the clinical nurse specialist. The content is highly specialized to areas of importance for advanced nurses in the management of obstetrics and neonatal patients and their families. Emphasis is placed on current nursing management and the application of research findings in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of advanced perinatal/neonatal nursing practice. Prerequisites: NURS 639, NURS 632, NURS 681, and NURS 687.

NURS 635 Practicum in Perinatal/Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialization Credits: 4

The focus of this course is on the application of theory from the areas of perinatal/neonatal nursing and clinical nurse specialization to clinical practice. Through supervision seminars and precepted clinical experiences, the student implements the role of the perinatal/neonatal clinical nurse specialist.

NURS 638 Special Problems in Perinatal/Neonatal Nursing Credits: 1-3

Provides for alternative learning experiences: independent study, development of specific clinical competencies, classes focusing on a variety of special interest topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature within the broad category of maternity nursing. Student may register for varying amounts of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 639 Advanced Nursing of the Childbearing Family and Neonate Credits: 4

The purpose of this course is to introduce the role of the neonatal nurse practitioner/clinician in the management of normal and high-risk families and infants. The focus of the course is to develop skills in physical and psychosocial assessment of childbearing families during all phases of the childbearing process: antenatal, intrapartum, postpartum, and the neonatal period. Special emphasis will be placed on events during the antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum period that affect the neonate and on application of the advanced nursing role in improving outcomes and care of these families, particularly the family at risk.

NURS 640 Advanced Nursing of the High-Risk Neonate I Credits: 5

The purpose of this second clinical course is to develop the knowledge and skills necessary in caring for infants at risk. The emphasis in this course is the development of a physiologic basis of managing care of the high-risk neonate. Concepts presented will include a discussion of embryology, pathophysiology, and management. Students will expand their skills in providing and managing care of the high risk neonate. Role development is continued as students explore the impact that the neonatal nurse practitioner has on improving services to high-risk infants and their families within the context of the neonatal intensive care unit.

NURS 641 Nursing of Children I Credits: 4

This course is the first clinical level in the maternal-child health nursing sequence and is open to non-majors as well as majors. It consists of an exploration of topics related to health promotion and health behaviors in the maternal-child health setting. Focus is on the nurse as an advanced practitioner, emphasizing the application of conceptual frameworks, clinical expertise, and patient teaching. Both core content in maternal- child health and specialized pediatric nursing topics are included. Prerequisite: NURS 602.

NURS 642 Nursing of Children II Credits: 4

This course, the second in the maternal-child health nursing sequence, has a dual focus on the development of in-depth knowledge of selected health problems of children and their nurse management, and on increasing collaborative and research skills in professional nursing. Application of theoretical and clinical knowledge occurs within an interdisciplinary collaborative relationship. Prerequisites: NURS 602, NURS 641. Prerequisite or concurrent: NPHY 608.

NURS 643 Nursing of Children III Credits: 2

In this course the student explores further the knowledge fundamental to the clinical nurse specialists role and practice in maternal child care settings. The practicum includes application and analysis of intervention strategies used by the clinical nurse specialist. Students work closely with mentors in selected nursing-of-children health care settings to develop their role as clinical expert, educator, consultant, researcher, and change agent. Course content and requirements also include selected nursing of children clinical topics relevant to advanced practitioners. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: NURS 641 and NURS 642.

NURS 644 Theoretical Issues in Adolescent Nursing Care Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to enhance the student's ability to provide effective nursing care to adolescents in a wide variety of care settings through developing a theoretical nursing framework for understanding the physical, social, psychological, and cognitive aspects of health development in adolescence. The course will also explore the current research regarding common health problems as well as other challenges facing adolescents in attaining optimum wellness, and will present a variety of theory-based intervention strategies for nursing care.

Finally, the course will explore public policy and strategic planning for improving the health status of the nation's adolescents.

NURS 645 Practicum in Pediatric Clinical Specialization Credits: 4

This is the third clinical course in the maternal-child nursing sequence. The focus of this course is on the application of theory from the areas of pediatric nursing and clinical nurse specialization to clinical practice. Through supervision seminars and precepted clinical experiences, the student implements the role of the pediatric clinical nurse specialist.

NURS 648 Special Problems in Nursing of Children Credits: 1-3

Provides alternative learning experiences: independent study, development of specific clinical competencies, classes focusing on a variety of special interest topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature within the broad category of nursing of children. Registration upon consent of advisor. Students may register for varying amounts of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree.

NURS 650 Foundations for Psychiatric Nursing I Credits: 3

This is the first-level course of a two-semester sequence that introduces the theoretical bases for concepts fundamental to advanced psychiatric nursing practice. The focus is on selected developmental theories. Emphasis is placed on the biopsychosocial assessment of a client. Offered fall semester.

NURS 651 Individual Therapy Credits: 3

Examines specific types of ineffective social behaviors as well as personality disturbances and their treatment within the contexts of psychiatric and nursing literature.

NURS 652 Group Theory and Practice I Credits: 3

Provides the basis for a conceptual framework in group psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to group practice. Included is the study of the therapist's role in the development of technical and communications skills in group work. Each student is required to co-lead a group approved by the faculty.

NURS 653 Group Theory and Practice II Credits: 3

Designed to further develop the student's theoretical and clinical expertise in group work and group psychotherapy. Emphasis is placed on the role of the therapist in integrating and using theoretical concepts in clinical group practice and in developing skills in supervision. Specialized group therapy techniques and research as related to group practice are reviewed. Prerequisite: NURS 652.

NURS 654 Liaison Nursing I Credits: 3

Students gain skills in therapeutic interaction with hospitalized, physically ill patients based upon their assessment of the patient's psychological needs and an evaluation of appropriate vehicles for their gratification. Goals are established that take into consideration physiological versus psychological priorities, assigning weights in terms of immediacy of need. The hospital is viewed as a social system, and means of interacting effectively in it are explored. Offered fall semester.

NURS 655 Orientation to Critical Concepts in Family Credits: 3

This course provides an orientation to the theories and techniques of family therapy. Emphasis on family systems theory (Bowen theory) and development of observational skills and interview experience with selected families.

NURS 656 Introduction to Clinical Practice with Families Credits: 3

This course provides an orientation to the role of the clinician in family therapy. Emphasis is on the identification of existing family behavior patterns. Clinical practice with at least one family is included. Prerequisite: NURS 655.

NURS 658 Special problems in Adult Psychiatric Nursing Credits: 1-3

Provides alternative learning experiences: independent study; development of specific clinical competencies; classes focusing on a variety of special interest topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature within the area of adult psychiatric nursing. Students may register for varying amounts of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 670 Issues in School Health Credits: 3

This course analyzes the roles, responsibilities, current theoretical frameworks and issues of nursing practice related to health promotion and maintenance of children in educational settings from kindergarten through college. Offered spring semester.

NURS 671 Epidemiology Credits: 3

A contemporary approach to epidemiological concepts and methods. General considerations and laboratory application to data in specific situations are included. Open to non-nursing majors with permission of instructor. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite: Statistics.

NURS 672 Community Health Nursing I Credits: 3

This first-level departmental course is designed to introduce students to advanced nursing theory and practice in community health. Students will address the nature and scope of community health and its relation to the public health sciences and to nursing in a clinical practice context. Clinical practice will focus on neighborhood, family, and community as the units of analysis. Students will explore advanced nursing practice from a historical perspective.

NURS 673 Community Health Nursing II Credits: 3

The theory content and clinical practicum of this course are designed for the study of families, through agencies and other support systems, with an emphasis upon nursing interventions. Prerequisite: NURS 671 or permission of instructor.

NURS 674 Community Health Nursing within the Health Care System Credits: 2

This advanced course relates the health level of a community to the organization of its health care system. The forces that are shaping the organization and delivery of community health nursing services are analyzed. An examination of theory and research, and comparison of various systems of health care organization provide the basis for discussion. Offered spring semester. Open to non-nursing majors with permission of instructor.

NURS 675 Community Health Nursing III Credits: 3

The theory content and clinical practicum of this course are designed for the study of health promotion and health maintenance programs as these are developed, implemented, and evaluated in agency settings. A secondary focus is the evaluation of families, neighborhoods, and other support systems and communities. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: NURS 671, 672 and 673.

NURS 676 Community Health Nursing Leadership: Approaches to Select Populations Credits: 3

Designed to provide graduate students in community health nursing and other specialty areas with an opportunity to gain additional knowledge and skills in the use of leadership strategies to achieve defined health objectives for a selected population. Emphasis is placed on program development and grantsmanship in the areas of health promotion and primary prevention. Prerequisite: NURS 671 or permission of instructor.

NURS 677 Food Addictions, Eating Disorders, and Weight Control Credits: 3

The theory, research content, and field experiences of this course focus on food addictions, eating disorders, the regulation of appetite and weight control, and the role of the nurse as it relates the core of clients experiencing these problems. Health implications and the importance of family dynamics in the care of clients are emphasized. Offered fall semester.

NURS 678 Special Problems in Community Health Nursing Credits: 1-3

Provides alternative learning experiences: independent study, development of specific clinical competencies, classes focusing on a variety of special interest topics or topics of an interdepartmental nature within the broad category of community health nursing. Students may register for varying amounts of credit ranging from one to three credits per semester with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 680 Curriculum Development in Nursing Credits: 3

Factors which determine content and organization of curricula in schools of nursing and health care agencies are identified and implications analyzed. Principles and processes of curriculum development are addressed from the standpoint of initiating and changing curricula. Curriculum components serve as unifying threads as students study and actually develop a curriculum. Systematic evaluation of the curriculum is explored.

NURS 681 Clinical Nurse Specialist Role I Credits: 1

This is the first of a two course series that examines the knowledge base fundamental to the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in health care settings. Course content focuses on the theory and intervention strategies used by the CNS in the role, emphasizing the components of expert practitioner, educator, and consultant in this first-level course.

NURS 682 Practicum in Teaching in Nursing Credits: 3

Experience in clinical and classroom settings promotes the opportunity for development and increased skill in the total teaching-learning process. An analytical approach to teaching effectiveness is emphasized. Placement in junior colleges, baccalaureate programs, or in-service settings is arranged according to track selected. Prerequisite or concurrent: NURS 680.

NURS 683 Practicum for Advanced Clinical Practice Credits: 4

Supervised experience is provided by each clinical department which will prepare the graduate student to function in advanced practice roles. Placement may be in community or home settings, chronic and long-term care facilities, or critical care areas. Prerequisites: Two semesters of clinical course work.

NURS 685 Instructional Strategies and Skills Credits: 3

Building on content of teaching-learning theory, this course focuses on the analysis and development of selected instructional strategies and skills in nursing education. The relationship of content and learning style to instructional method is considered, with particular attention given to the selection, preparation, and use of media and modes appropriate to teaching in nursing. A microteaching approach is used to demonstrate student-teacher performance in a variety of teaching strategies. Techniques for the evaluation of teacher and student are examined. Prerequisite: NURS 680 or permission of instructor.

NURS 686 Principles and Practices of Client/Family Teaching Credits: 3

Focuses on principles and practices of client/family teaching that facilitate the behaviors required to maximize the health potential of those experiencing acute or chronic illness. Consideration is given to the entire process of client/family teaching during the illness episode. The influence of values, attitudes, and beliefs on compliance is explored. Opportunities are provided for students to develop client/family teaching plans according to their area of interest.

NURS 687 Clinical Nurse Specialist Role II Credits: 1

This is the second of a two-course series that examines the knowledge base fundamental to the role of the clinical nurse specialist (CNS). Course content focuses on the theory and intervention strategies used by the CNS in the role, emphasizing the components of researcher, change agent, and collaborator in this second-level course. Prerequisite: NURS 681.

NURS 688 Special Problems in Nursing Education Credits: 1-3

The major objectives of this independent study experience are to develop further competencies in the area of teaching. Students may register for one to three credits per semester, with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration upon consent of advisor.

NURS 689 Curriculum Development in Nursing Credits: 3

Factors that determine content and organization of curricula in schools of nursing and health care agencies are identified and implications analyzed. Principles and processes of curriculum development are addressed from the standpoint of initiating and changing curricula. Curriculum components serve as unifying threads as students study and actually develop a curriculum. Systematic evaluation of the curriculum is explored.

NURS 690 Managerial Health Finance Credits: 3

Focuses on the role and responsibility of the administrator in fiscal management of health care institutions in both the public and private sectors. Training is provided in resource management and accountability. Conceptual and practical issues related to health care economics, financial management, and budget preparation are stressed. Prerequisite: NURS 606.

NURS 691 Organization Theory: Application to Nursing Management Credits: 3

This is the first course in the nursing service administration series, and it serves as a foundation for the other curriculum offerings. The content is based upon social science theories and administrative elements of planning, organizing, leading, and evaluating. Management principles are outlined and issues related to organizational behavior in the health care industry are discussed. A realistic focus is developed through the use of simulation, small group exercises, self-assessment instruments, and audio-visual aids.

NURS 692 Administration of Nursing Service Credits: 3

This is the second of the courses in the nursing service administration series. The focus is on the process of nursing administration. Advanced management principles and practices are studied in view of the nursing leadership role, and these are tailored to match the learner's level in the organization, e.g., middle-level or executive. Content is specific to issues evolving within an ever-changing health care system, and case analysis is used to ensure analytic thinking. Prerequisite: NURS 691.

NURS 694 Theory and Practice in Nurse Administration Credits: 6

This is the capstone course of the nursing service administration track for students preparing for first or middle management nursing positions. The learner is exposed to nursing management and/or leadership in a real-world setting. Students are assigned to a health care agency where they become involved with the integration of theory into practice, and time is allotted for empirical study of a specific problem or content area within the scope of nursing administration. Prerequisites: NURS 690, NURS 691, and NURS 692.

NURS 695 Theory and Practice in Nursing Administration Advanced Credits: 6

This is the capstone course of the nursing administration track for students preparing for advanced or executive leadership and management responsibilities in a selected health care delivery system. The student negotiates personal and program objectives with a preceptor and faculty in order to prepare for an executive nursing administration position. Time is allotted for empirical study of a specific problem or content area within the scope of nursing administration. This course is designed for students with two or more years of formal nursing administration experience. Prerequisites: NURS 690, NURS 691, and NURS 692.

NURS 697 Nursing and Health Policy Credits: 3

This seminar focuses on the analysis, formulation, and implementation of health policy viewed from a historical perspective with an examination of selected current issues in nursing and health care. Attention is given to the role of nurses in influencing policy decisions. Prerequisites: NURS 602, NURS 606, and POSI 601 or POSI 602.

NURS 698 Special Problems in Nursing Administration Credits: 1-3

The major objective of this independent study experience is to develop further competencies in the area of administration. Students may register for one to three credits per semester, with a maximum of six credits per degree. Registration by consent of advisor.

NURS 699 Theory and Practice in Nursing-Health Policy Credits: 6

This culminating course provides nursing-health policy majors the opportunity to enhance their policy-related skills through observation and direct participation in the policy process within a governmental or private agency that deals with health care issues. Placement is in accord with students' special policy interest in the nursing/health care field.

NURS 701 Nursing Research Designs and Analysis I Credits: 3

Includes understanding scientific thinking and quantitative methods of research beyond the introductory level. The research literature in nursing and health is used to illustrate and evaluate application of these principles. Univariate and bivariate research designs are stressed. Working in teams, students plan and implement a nursing research project.

NURS 702 Nursing Research Designs and Analysis II Credits: 3

An introduction to both quantitative multivariate and qualitative designs used in nursing research. Selection of the most appropriate design to fit a nursing research question is stressed. Procedures for data quality assurance and analysis are presented. Statistical computer programs are used with actual nursing data. Throughout, reports of nursing research are critiqued and discussed. Prerequisite: NURS 701.

NURS 704 Program Evaluation in Nursing Credits: 3

This elective course introduces students to various models and approaches available for the evaluation of nursing programs in both educational and service settings. Class discussions focus on the components of various models, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and their utility for the evaluation of nursing programs. Opportunities to evaluate program evaluation efforts in nursing are also provided. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NURS 705 Medical Anthropology for Health Professionals Credits: 3

This course is for graduate-level health professionals who do not have extensive backgrounds in culture theory. Medical anthropology (which focuses on health and illness from a holistic, cultural perspective) contributes substantially to understanding sociocultural processes involved in health and healing. Cultural adaptation in a central concept and is reflected in nutritional, illness behaviors, stress management, belief systems, and numerous other patterns. Models of ethnomedicine (culturally oriented systems of medicine and treatment) and ethnocaring (traditional systems of care) are discussed to illustrate concepts of disease causation, healing practices, and caring patterns in traditional and industrialized cultures. The course also examines relationships between Western and alternative systems of health care and medicine.

NURS 707 Health, Health Care, and Culture Credits: 3

This course is designed to expand sensitivity, awareness, knowledge, and skills necessary to work effectively with individuals or groups whose cultural backgrounds differ from the provider's. Themes of health, illness, and the provision of culturally congruent care make the course appropriate for master's and doctoral students interested in helping consumers and providers in health care delivery and health policy formulation systems to acknowledge and accommodate culture-specific needs.

NURS 708 Special Problems in Nursing Research Credits: 1-3

The major objective of this independent study is to develop further research competencies. Registration upon consent of instructor. Variable amounts of credit ranging from one to three per semester may be taken, with a maximum of six credits per degree.

NURS 710 Health Supervision of the Well Child I Credits: 3

The first of two sequential courses that focus on health promotion and health maintenance for children. This course deals primarily with the health needs of children during the first five years of life. The student functions at a beginning level as a nurse practitioner in an ambulatory setting. Emphasis is placed on application of the nursing process: assessing the physical, personal, and cognitive expressions of health of well children during their first five years of life within the context of their family environments, developing plans of care based on knowledge of the cultural patterns of the family and of the predominant pattern of organization of the child's expressions of health, implementing and evaluating nursing strategies to promote health and development. Prerequisites: NURS 602, NURS 611, or permission of instructor.

NURS 711 Health Supervision of the Well Child II Credits: 3

This is the second of two sequential courses that apply the conceptual frameworks and the nursing process through the use of communication assessment skills, assessment skills, and the development, implementation, and evaluation of plans of care. The course focuses on the personal, cognitive, and physical health needs of school-age children and adolescents. Normal growth and development are emphasized. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: NURS 710 or permission of instructor.

NURS 712 Quality in Health Care Credits: 3

This course presents a comprehensive practical overview of the concepts, tools, and organizational models used to improve the quality of all products and services in health care. Concepts, principles, and philosophies are illustrated with applications from the clinical setting. Content is relevant to all nurses who will provide leadership in clinical practice, management, or education.

NURS 713 Common Health Problems of Children I Credits: 2

This is the first of two sequential courses that focus on selected health problems of children frequently encountered in ambulatory settings and the underlying alterations in health equilibrium. Emphasis is placed on problem identification, application of appropriate regulatory processes, and evaluation of the effectiveness of intervention. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite: NURS 611.

NURS 714 Common Health Problems of Children II Credits: 3

The focus of this second of two sequential courses is selected health care problems of children and the underlying alterations in health equilibrium. The problems considered are of a more complex nature or more prevalent for older children and adolescents. Problem identification, application of appropriate regulatory processes, and evaluation of the effectiveness of invention are emphasized. Offered fall semester. Prerequisite: NURS 713.

NURS 715 Advanced Primary Care of Children Credits: 5

Designed to assist the student to integrate and synthesize the material from all course work, material previously learned, and some new concepts relevant to the pediatric nurse practitioner in primary care. Clinical experiences require that the student assume a more independent role in assessing and managing the health care of children from birth to adolescence as part of a multidisciplinary health care team. Prerequisites: NURS 711 and NURS 714.

NURS 736 Computer Applications in Nursing and Health Credits: 3

Fosters the attainment of knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential for beginning a successful career as a nursing administrator, educator, or expert clinician in a computerized health care delivery system. Emphasis on nursing applications of information technology. Prerequisite: NURS 691 or permission of instructor.

NURS 737 Concepts in Nursing Informatics Credits: 3

This second-level nursing informatics course is designed to further develop the skills of information technology and to emphasize the principles and practices of nursing informatics. Dynamics of system selection, implementation and evaluation are explored. Principles of change and other organizational theories are considered in relation to information planning, implementation, and evaluation. The management of ongoing nursing information systems, the use of decision support systems in nursing, and the use of integrated data for system development are examined. The impact of computerization on health provider roles and on emerging information technology roles is analyzed. Prerequisites: NURS 736, NURS 691, and IFOA 601.

NURS 738 Practicum in Nursing Informatics Credits: 3

This third-level nursing informatics course provides practical experience in selected health care agencies to reinforce and enhance skills needed in analyzing, selecting, developing, implementing, and evaluating nursing information systems. Experiences also allow students to analyze the roles of their preceptors in relation to information technology and organizations. Placements are in accord with the student's career goals and interests. Experience in project management, user interface, evaluation of system effectiveness, and application of research findings are emphasized. During the practicum, students will work with a preceptor who is functioning within the field of nursing informatics. Prerequisites: NURS 691, NURS 736, NURS 737, IFOA 600, and IFOA 601.

NURS 740 Advanced Nursing of the High-Risk Neonate II Credits: 3

This third clinical course offers students the opportunity to begin to apply the material learned in the first two clinical courses in the NICU. While the second course provided the physiologic base for provision of care and the opportunity to develop skills, this course enables students to participate in case management of high-risk infants and families. Clinical experiences provide students with the opportunity to integrate knowledge and skills in managing care of high-risk infants and families in the clinical setting. Continuing focus on role development will also occur. Implementation of the research project will begin during this session. Offered summer semester. Prerequisites: NURS 639 and NURS 640.

NURS 741 Advanced Nursing of the High-Risk Neonate III Credits: 6

This fourth clinical course is the final synthesis course in the clinical sequence. Students will continue to manage care of the high-risk neonate with an emphasis on developing collaborative relationships with other members of the health team. With completion of this course, and NURS 742, Primary Care for High-Risk Neonates, the student will meet all requirements specified by the NCC corporation for the certification examination as a neonatal nurse practitioner. Continuing discussion of the advanced practice role is also completed in this course. Offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: NURS 639, NURS 640, and NURS 740.

NURS 742 Primary Care of the High-Risk Neonate Credits: 2

The seminar will provide students with the skills necessary to provide primary health care to high-risk infants in the home and the follow-up clinics. Course material will include detailed physical assessment skills of the infant through the first year of life. The clinical component will include preparation for discharge, community resources, home visits, and experience in the ambulatory setting. Small group clinical seminars will focus on critical analysis of primary health care issues for the high-risk infant in the home and follow-up clinic. Through clinical practice the student will demonstrate advanced clinical skills in the assessment, intervention, and management of the high-risk infant after discharge from the acute care setting, through the first year of life. Offered fall semester. Prerequisites: NURS 639, NURS 640, and NURS 740.

NURS 750 Foundations for Psychiatric Nursing II Credits: 2

This second half of a two-semester course provides graduate students in psychiatric nursing with a theoretical basis for clinical practice, an overview of multiple schools of psychotherapy, and a matrix within which to integrate concepts that are particularly relevant to psychiatric nursing. The course content encourages the student to view the client developmentally in order to assess the student's or the family's problem(s) and to choose therapeutic interventions that are grounded either in theory or in knowledge generated from empirically tested data. Offered spring semester.

NURS 754 Liaison Nursing II Credits: 3

The second-level course in psychiatric liaison nursing presents material relevant to specific patient populations that are targeted by the liaison practitioner. In the latter half of the course, the student begins to explore those issues involved in working with nursing staff, rather than directly with patients, to meet the latter's psychological needs. In addition, liaison research projects that were identified in the first-level course are further developed to meet seminar paper or thesis requirements. Prerequisite: NURS 654.

NURS 755 Families in Crisis: Theory and Intervention Credits: 3

Introduces students to the systems theory orientation for understanding human functioning within a family system, with an application of this orientation to personal, patient/family, and health care delivery systems. The family is the unit of study with systems theory analyzed and applied to clinical issues and situations in various health care settings (acute, chronic, inpatient, outpatient, and long-term care facilities). Clinical intervention with families and supervision are components of this course. Prerequisites: NURS 602 and permission of instructor.

NURS 759 Violence as a Health Care Problem in America Credits: 2

Provides students the opportunity to identify and analyze the issue of violence and how violence influences health care and society. Broad areas to be covered will include theoretical approaches to the study of violence, clinical manifestations of various forms of violence, and violence interventions at the individual, family, and societal level. Specific topics will include family violence, rape and sexual assault, stranger assault, violent patients, violence to patients, and societal aggression and violence.

NURS 772 Issues in International Health and Nursing Credits: 3

This elective uses the WHO concept of primary health care as a framework for focusing on health in developing countries. Students explore environmental, sociocultural, political, and economic factors influencing health in developing countries, discuss parallels and contrasts with industrialized countries, and apply the principles of primary health care to understand strategies for improving health. Experiential learning is emphasized along with lectures, discussion, readings, and films. Students from any UMAB school are welcome.

NURS 773 Cultural Diversity and Health Credits 3

The goal of this course is to provide intercultural nursing (ICN) students with an opportunity to explore cross-cultural considerations that affect the provision of nursing services for select populations. Students will explore culturally universal themes and core concepts that influence health beliefs and behaviors. Students will analyze current issues involved in community level health care with culturally diverse groups. The professional nurse's role in meeting the health care needs of individuals, families, and groups in the community is addressed.

NURS 774 Culture and Communication Credits: 3

Students will examine factors that limit individual and family use of health interventions, with particular emphasis on language, stressors affecting the management of health concerns, and characteristics of health services that impede their use. Particular emphasis is given to facilitating communication with clients, and promoting the use of available services with respect for cultural health practices.

NURS 775 Home Health Care Nursing Credits: 3

Designed as an elective for graduate students in nursing who seek an in-depth orientation to clinical nursing practice in the home setting. This course builds on theory and learning experiences provided in the clinical major. Students develop prototypical care plans for individuals with selected health problems or risk factors. Emphasis is placed on the nurse as coordinator, deliverer, and monitor of patient care in the home. Field experiences for assessment and evaluation are provided. Offered spring semester. Prerequisite: First-level clinical course.

NURS 776 Culture and Health Services Credits 3

The purpose of this course is to enhance the analytic and comparative skills of the intercultural nursing student through a study of community health nursing services for culturally diverse groups. Policy issues, standards of care, informed choice and consent, and sociocultural norms will be considered. Students will have an opportunity to apply analytical and planning skills to the problems identified among culturally diverse groups regarding access to and utilization of health services.

NURS 777 Ethnographic Field Techniques in Health Care Settings Credits 3

This is a course in the logical sequencing and conduct of qualitative research field techniques in clinical contexts. Students analyze theoretical orientations to qualitative research. Students will examine triangulation and the appropriate blends of qualitative/quantitative approaches to clinical research questions.

NURS 789 Fundamental Tools of Qualitative Inquiry Credits: 3

This course immerses students in the hands-on, experiential process of conducting qualitative research. In- class activities involve students working together and individually to formulate appropriate research questions, conduct in-depth interviews, generate accurate and reliable fieldnotes and thick descriptions, manage text data, and code and analyze qualitative data. Each student will complete a small research study of interest. Prerequisites: NURS 702, NURS 815, a comparable course on qualitative research, or permission of instructor.

NURS 790 Ethics and Nursing Practice Credits: 3

The purpose of this elective course is to enhance the graduate student's ability (1) to describe and analyze moral concepts foundational to nursing practice and (2) to apply elements of these concepts in the practice of nursing. The historical development of these concepts in the professional ethic will be presented, and theories of medical and nursing ethics will be analyzed. Opportunity will be provided for the student to apply elements of these concepts and theories of ethics to the practice of nursing through a case study approach.

NURS 791 Contemporary Ethical Theory Credits: 3

This course is for philosophy majors and for graduate level health professionals. The "care ethic," which stresses personal responsibility and solicitude for identified others, has been associated with a "feminine" philosophical perspective. It is also claimed by some health professionals to be particularly applicable to biomedical ethical issues. This course will provide an intensive study of the "care ethic" by examining its strengths and weaknesses for personal morality, social policy, and professional conduct. It will also examine the possibility of "evil caring" and make applications of the "care ethic" to euthanasia, abortion, aging, and drug and sex education.

NURS 792 Ethical Issues at the Edges of Life Credits: 3

The purpose of this elective course is to enhance the graduate student's ability to (1) use ethical theory and principles of moral justification in the analysis of selected issues of moral concern, (2) examine and analyze moral problems in health care relationships, and (3) examine and analyze selected issues of moral concern at two points on the life continuum--the beginning and the end of life. Consequentialistic and nonconsequentialistic theories of ethics, and the nature of moral justification will be discussed in depth and students will have the opportunity to use theoretical positions and levels of moral justification in their analysis of moral issues.

NURS 793 Organizational Transformation Credits: 3

This course focuses on organizational evaluation and strategic redesign of health care systems. Issues creating an impetus for organizational change will be examined. Theories and models of traditional organizational structures and of creative and collaborative redesign will be discussed. Prerequisites: NURS 692 and NURS 702.

NURS 794 New Directions in Qualitative Research Credits: 3

This elective research course introduces students to new paradigmatic perspectives as the basis for inquiry in the human sciences. It highlights qualitative methods of inquiry that are relevant to emerging issues, epistemological developments, and the evolution of the philosophic foundations reflected in research in nursing, health care, and education. Students are expected to be active participants in a dialectic and dialogical process that enhances class discussions and the development of individual research projects. Prerequisites: NURS 702, NURS 815, a comparable course on qualitative research, or permission of instructor.

NURS 797 Policy and Politics in Nursing and Health Care Credits: 3

This elective course explores the U.S. health policy-making system, including policy paradigms, political ideology and dynamics, and federal-state relationships. Emphasis is on development of strategies to preserve quality in and access to health care services.

NURS 799 Master's Thesis Research Credits: 1-6

NURS 801 Conceptual Basis for Nursing Credits: 2

Provides experience in conceptualizing health-related behavior as an initial step in nursing research. Biological, psychological, cognitive, and social dimensions of selected concepts relevant to nursing practice are examined theoretically and operationally. The interrelatedness of these dimensions is viewed as constituting a major focus in the study of humans from a nursing perspective.

NURS 802 Analysis of Direct Nursing Action Credits: 4

Clinical settings are used for the examination of client states and nursing actions. From a theoretical perspective, students will develop and implement a plan for study of nursing actions and the client states that are stimuli for and responses to nursing actions. Prerequisite: NURS 801.

NURS 803 Conceptualization of Nursing Systems Credits: 2

An overview of the social, political, and organizational contexts within which nursing is practiced and taught. Includes an introduction to and comparison of organizational and systems theories and consideration of organizational problems of particular importance to the practice and teaching of nursing.

NURS 804 Analysis of Indirect Nursing Action Credits: 4

The processes by which national health and nursing policies are determined and organizational problems of particular importance to the practice and teaching of nursing are analyzed. Emphasis is placed on factors that influence the acquisition and use of nursing resources, the regulation of nursing practice, authority, and decision making and conflict management in organizations. Prerequisite: NURS 803.

NURS 805 Analysis and Development of Nursing Theory Credits: 4

Philosophical bases for nursing theory are analyzed and several metatheoretical approaches to theory development are studied. Extant nursing theories are analyzed, compared, and evaluated. Prerequisite: NURS 602 or equivalent.

NURS 806 Seminar in N

ursing Science Credits: 2 Philosophical, theoretical, and professional issues to be considered in discovering and verifying nursing knowledge are addressed. Approaches to theory development in nursing are examined and applied. Prerequisite: NURS 805.

NURS 808 Special Problems in Nursing Science Credits: 1-3

Students select a topic of particular interest related to the development of nursing science to be studied with a graduate faculty member with special competence in the subject area. Topics that can be selected include aspects of nursing theory and research methodology. Specific objectives and requirements are determined by contractual agreement prior to registration. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

NURS 811 Measurement of Nursing Phenomena Credits: 3

The theoretical basis of measurement is presented as a foundation for the development and evaluation of measurement tools for use in nursing research. Types of measures, techniques of construction, the statistical analysis of reliability and validity, and strengths and limitations for use of selected measures in nursing research will be presented. Nursing research studies are evaluated relative to measurement theory. Tools and procedures, including those used to measure affective, cognitive, behavioral, and physiological aspects of selected concepts, are evaluated. Prerequisite: NURS 813 or equivalent.

NURS 812 Seminar in Nursing Measurement Credits: 3

The theoretical basis of measurement will be applied in a highly individualized experience in the development of an instrument to measure a selected concept of relevance in nursing research. The seminar provides the opportunity for discussion of problems, issues, and strategies involved in tool construction and validation. Prerequisites: NURS 811 and 813.

NURS 813 Design of Nursing Research Credits: 3

The emphasis in this course is on the acquisition of methods and techniques for extending the scientific base of knowledge for nursing practice. Research studies, taken from the health care literature, that address questions of impact to nursing serve as foci for discussion. Experimental and quasiexperimental designs and related statistical procedures are examined in terms of their appropriateness for addressing various nursing problems. Selected probability sampling designs are addressed.

NURS 814 Design of Nursing Research II Credits: 2

Emphasis is on survey research design and related analytic procedures for the study of nursing problems. Sampling theory and procedures and strategies for managing large data sets are included. Prerequisite: NURS 813.

NURS 815 Advanced Seminar in Nursing Research Credits: 2

Emphasis is on use of qualitative research designs and related analytic procedures for the study of nursing problems. Included are evaluation research strategies and issues of quality control in field settings. Prerequisite or concurrent: NURS 813, NURS 816, or equivalent.

NURS 816 Multivariate Analysis in Health Care Research Credits: 3

Introduces multivariate procedures most useful in health care research, including multiple regression, multivariate analysis of variance, principal components analysis, factor analysis, and discriminant analysis. Computer programs are used in data analysis from actual research situations. A heuristic approach is used, although opportunities for more rigorous study are provided for students with requisite mathematical background. Two two-hour sessions per week combine lecture and laboratory.

NURS 817 Repeated Measure Anova Designs in Nursing and Health Care Research Credits: 2

Analysis of variance designs involving repeated observations on the same cases. Topics include one-way and factorial designs, repeated measures analysis of covariance, and doubly multivariate designs.

NURS 818 Special Topics in Nursing Research Credits: 1-3

A directed, individually planned research experience that provides doctoral students the opportunity to work collaboratively with a faculty member on an ongoing research project. Specific requirements and credit are determined by contractual agreement; repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

NURS 828 Issues in Nursing Scholarship Credits: 3

This course provides students with the opportunity to identify and analyze professional issues confronting the nurse scholar. Among the issues to be presented and discussed are: research priorities, options in career patterns, ethics and politics of science, protection of human subjects, grant getting and publishing, and presenting research. When appropriate, diverse perspectives will be presented and students will be expected to synthesize the material and identify those principles appropriate for their own careers.

NURS 836 Judgment/Decision Making in Nursing Informatics Credits: 3

This course reflects the central role of decision science in utilizing nursing informatics to improve patient care. It analyzes selected decision science theories and relevant research that supports and directs the field of nursing informatics. Decision sciences include statistically based models of clinical judgment, information processing theory of clinical judgment, and theories for knowledge and skill acquisition. Case simulations, protocol analysis, knowledge engineering, decision analysis models, grounded theory, neural networks, and ways of knowing are evaluated for their usefulness to nursing informatics.

NURS 837 Nursing Informatics in Quality of Care Credits: 3

This companion course to Nursing 836 addresses aggregate level data analysis in the application of nursing informatics to describing, improving, measuring, and delivering quality care. It employs a broad definition of systems and analyzes selected systems theories and relevant research that supports and directs the field of nursing informatics and its use of available and emerging technology. Theories are applied to the study of systems to determine their definitions and boundaries, facilitate the application of quality of care models, and enhance the access, quality, and cost effectiveness of care. A multidimensional model provides a framework for the study of the direct and indirect effects of nursing information technology. Prerequisite: NURS 836.

NURS 881 Theoretical and Methodological Issues on Coping Credits: 2

This course provides the doctoral student with an opportunity to develop a conceptual framework for viewing and researching the process of coping. Through a survey and critical review of both historical and contemporary literature from multiple disciplines, the student examines an array of models of coping and ultimately develops a prospectus for individual or group studies on coping with stress, in health and disease.

NURS 882 Concept Clarification in Nursing: Physiological Basis Credits: 2

Exploration of clinical nursing problems and related concepts from a physiological perspective. Included are aspects of regulation, transmission, and physiological measurement. Prerequisites: NPHY 600 or equivalent, NURS 801 or permission of instructor.

NURS 883 Research and Theory in Family Health Nursing Credits: 3

Provides opportunity to explore and evaluate theories used for the study of families within the nursing context. Nursing perspectives of the family over the family life cycle are considered. Emphasis is placed on analyzing theoretical and conceptual issues in nursing related to the family and to the design and implementation of family nursing research studies, measurement of family variables, and analysis of family data.

NURS 885 Ethical Inquiry in Nursing Credits: 2

The purpose of this elective course is to enhance the doctoral student's ability to 1) explore traditional approaches to ethical inquiry, 2) examine the relationships between ethical knowledge and scientific knowledge, 3) analyze the current state of ethical inquiry in nursing, and 4) propose theoretical and methodological approaches for a selected research interest in health care ethics.

NURS 888 Special Problems in Direct Nursing Credits: 1-3

Students select a topic of particular professional interest within the sphere of direct nursing, to be studied with a graduate faculty member with special competence in the subject area. Specific objectives and requirements are determined by contractual agreement prior to registration. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

NURS 891 Theory and Research in Educational Administration in Nursing Credits: 2

This seminar is designed to address current theoretical perspective and research regarding the practice of educational administration in nursing. Building upon knowledge of nursing and health care, organizational theory, policy analysis, educational administration, and nursing education gained in prerequisite courses, selected issues and problems in higher education administration are explored. An optional practicum is available for additional credit through registration in NURS 898. Prerequisites: NURS 804, NURS 815 or permission of instructor.

NURS 898 Special Problems in Indirect Nursing Credits: 1-3

Students select a topic of professional interest within the sphere of indirect nursing, to be studied with a graduate faculty member with special competence in the subject area. Specific objectives and requirements are determined by contractual agreement prior to registration. Repeatable to a maximum of 6 credits.

NURS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research Variable Credits: 1-12

NPHY 600 Human Physiology and Pathophysiology Credits: 3

Focuses on the study of selected areas in normal human physiology and pathophysiology. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of normal function using a problem-solving process. Major regulating and integrative mechanisms and examples of non optimal to pathological function are elaborated to elucidate a conceptual approach to the physiologic basis of nursing practice. The course builds upon a basic knowledge of physiology.

NPHY 608 Special Problems: Reproduction and Neonatal Physiology Credits 2

Builds upon the concepts developed in NPHY 600 to provide more extensive knowledge of human reproduction and the physiologic function of the newborn infant. Selected examples of pathophysiology will also be presented. The focus is upon developing a scientific client assessment of needs and selecting regulatory processes for the care of clients with complex physical needs. Concepts addressed include: reproduction, growth, oxygenation, circulation, motion, motility, and elimination.

NPHY 610 Methods and Principles of Applied Physiology I Credits: 3

Designed to provide the student with a deeper base of scientific knowledge that correlates physiology and corresponding alterations to a process of clinical diagnosis and management. The course elaborates upon specific pathophysiologic principles and a study of disease entities. It also provides exercises in applying epidemiological knowledge in clinical practice and preventive health settings. Prerequisite: NPHY 600.

NPHY 612 Psychophysiological Basis for Nursing Credits: 3

Introduces the beginning graduate nursing student to selected aspects of human psychophysiology that provide the basis for advanced nursing practice in medical-surgical settings. Emphasis is placed on the psychophysiological basis of selected health problems and on principles that underlie therapeutic nursing intervention. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NPHY 614 Physiology of Aging Credits: 2

Designed for graduate students in the health professions with a special interest in gerontology. The emphasis is on cell biology, metabolic process, cardiovascular, and neurobiological aspects of aging. The pathophysiological basis for health problems of older adults in presented. Alterations at the cell, organ, and system levels are discussed to provide the basis for clinical management of common health problems. Prerequisite: NPHY 600 or DPHS 611 or the equivalent.

NPHY 620 Physiological Alterations in the Critically Ill Patient Credits: 3

Includes lectures defining and describing alterations in the physiological processes commonly seen in trauma/critically ill patients and application of this theory base through supervised clinical experience in the trauma/critical care unit. The course is designed to enhance the student's assessment skills and knowledge base of pathophysiological findings. The patient is the unit of analysis. Prerequisites: NPHY 600 and NURS 602.

HGEN 635 Applied Human Genetics Credits: 2

This course is provided for students in nursing and other allied health professions. With the explosion of information in the field of genetics and its predominance in the lay press, it is important that all professionals have some awareness of the issues and advances in genetics. Topics include patterns of inheritance, DNA to protein synthesis, chromosome abnormalities, genetics syndromes, principles of teratology as well as discussions of prenatal diagnosis and genetic engineering. Each student will be required to prepare a case study based on a patient with a genetic disease.

Coded by Anthony Williams